Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Ten Image Critique

1. 
Not exactly certain of what this image is trying to convey. It seems as if it was taken from a moving vehicle. The entire image is blurry, with trees poking into the field of view that are distracting from the overall landscape - which could be captured well if time were taken in doing so. Take time with the image next time, and make sure you get a clear image, adjusting the shutter speed as necessary. Including more horizon and sky would add to the composition of this image. Over all this image confuses me. 

2.
This is a very bright picture, and I think it works well with what type of picture it is. The blues of the thermal features and sky are beautiful, especially in contrast with the white and grey of the surrounding soil. This picture has many layers landscape that lead you through the image well. It also uses the rule of thirds effectively.

3.
This is a fun picture! The black and white suits it extremely well. The twig bundle is crystal clear, leaving everything else blurred, yet you can still see what is out there. Even though it is black and white you can tell there are many different colors and tones captured in the landscape. The rule of thirds is not followed precisely here, however the image still is very aesthetically pleasing.  

4.
This image is an incredibly creative perspective to capture a geyser, in my opinion. The composition of the image is great, the rule of thirds is clear. The steam covering the entire middle of the image, yet retaining depth with in the steam is very intriguing. The colors are powerful and do not overwhelm the image. This is a great image, and I like looking at it. 

5.
This is a great sunset image. It truly captures the essence of Montana and the beauty of the west. The inclusion of the silhouetted tree works well, adding needed detail to a beautiful background. While the rule of thirds is not apparent here, you could argue that the sunset could be broken into thirds effectively. The colors are great and diverse. Overall a good exposure.

6.
This is a very cool image of the mud-pots in Yellowstone National Park. Clearly a very fast shutter speed was used, and it worked. The boiling mud is perfectly clear. The rule of thirds is applied vertically here, which is a nice change. The could be more color here, but the image still works very well, capturing the essence the mud-pots effectively.

7.
This is a very cool picture. I love stars and this image captures them quite well. I would be interested to see what it looks like in color, however the black and white still works well. The rule of thirds is here. The rock clearly leads your eye through the image up into the stars and the milky way. 

8.
This picture captures the moment in the mountains quite well. The weather complements the landscape well. The crossing line of rock in the left corner adds perspective to really put you in that place in that time. The rule of thirds are used here well. The colors of the lake, sky, clouds, and hills all contrast each other well to give the picture a great feel.

9.
This is a great picture of the Montana prairie. The colors are great, the image is clear, the landscape is great as well. The only flaw is the camera's perspective. If the tree was farther to the left, it would improve the composition of the image greatly. Also, if the image were taken from a higher perspective, it would provide a clearer view of the mountains and eliminate the problem of the rocks blocking the view. 

10.
This picture uses colors and lines very well. The colors pop. Not to much, not to little. Also, the crossing diagonal lines in the hills are great. The rule of thirds seems to be present here as well.

Nature

We all know that mother nature can be one of the most powerful forces to act upon anything. Capturing the perfect picture of nature at work can be just as challenging.


Timing the picture to capture lightning strikes


Braving dust devils


Or crazy squall lines - if you are successful you will certainly capture a true image of beauty. 


Tuesday, December 3, 2013

30 Image Presentation

All images were taken inside Yellowstone National Park.



Camera: Nikon D50
ISO 400
F/5.6
1/160
55 mm 
Camera: Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/5.6
1/100
70 mm

Camera: Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/5.6
1/200
300 mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/18
1/160
70 mm

Camera: Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/5.6
1/400
300 mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/5.6
1/250
300 mm

Camera: Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/5.6
1/250
300 mm

Camera: Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/5.6
1/250
300 mm

 Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/9
1/500
18mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/36
1/6
55mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/13
1/125
48 mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/9
1/320
24 mm


 Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/5.6
1/125
300mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/36
1/3
48mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/29
1/60
30 mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/5.6
1/125
55 mm

Camera Nikon D50 
ISO 200
f/25
1/6
24 mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/13
1/13
18 mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/13
1/25

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 320
f/5.6
1/500
300 mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/10
1/250
31 mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/11
1/500
18mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/11
1/400
18 mm

Camera Nikon D50 
ISO 200
f/11
1/400
48 mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/11
1/320
30 mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/9
1/320
42mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/7.1
1/500
18mm

 Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/3.5
1/2500
18mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/9
1/320
55mm

Camera Nikon D50
ISO 200
f/7.1
1/20
300 mm
 

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Three Image Critique

Image 1: This image is an effective exposure of a beautiful landscape. It does a good job of capturing the entire image in and outside of the shadow of the mountain.

Image 2: This image is a close up shot of water breaking over rocks on a beach. It uses a longer exposure well to blur the motion of the water waking all the water seem to blend together. It uses the rule of thirds well too.

Image 3: This image is a close up shot of a jumping squirrel. It clearly used a very fast shutter speed in order to capture the squirrel so clearly mid motion. This image too uses the rule of thirds well.

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Ice

One of the most powerful forces that shapes the surface of the earth is ice. Glacial Ice and sea ice both can serve as excellent subjects for nature and landscape photography. The beep blue colors of the ice mixed with the white of snow makes for great contrast and beautiful exposures.



Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The Heavens

Capturing the beauty of a clear night sky has always made for excellent photography. Shooting stars, countless constellations, and the milky way are some of the incredible things you can capture while aiming your camera up towards the heavens. These pictures below were taken from http://www.davemorrowphotography.com/, and are quite good in my opinon.




Monday, November 18, 2013

Under The Earth

Cave photography is something that would be incredibly fun - if you are not claustrophobic! Deep inside these remote caves you can capture images of some truly beautiful cavescapes. Underwater caves are always an option too!




These cave pictures were gathered from National geographic.